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Posts Tagged ‘kielbasa’

Queen City Smoked Sausage Review

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Queen City Smoked Sausage ReviewWhen I made my initial foray to America’s foodie wonderland, Jungle Jims in Cincinnati last week, one item I picked up was a local product, Queen City Smoke Sausage.

(The official sausage of the Reds, apparently). Sausage is a big deal in Cincinnati, as is German food in general.  So popular, the city celebrates its sausage heritage with a weekend fest in July, with two to three dozen purveyors offering their sausage and related wares.

A skinless, smoked sausage of pork and beef, mildly seasoned, is called a “Mettwurst” or simply a “Mett” in this part of the country.

A traditional Mett in Germany is usually pork only, cured and smoked, and strongly seasoned with spices and garlic.  Although even in Germany, you’ll find different versions of the “Mett.”

Two states away, in Wisconsin or Illinois, this exact flavor and texture of skinless sausage would be called a Polish, or kielbasa.  Queen City brand is one of the more popular local processors, around since 1965, and in addition to smoked sausage, they offer a Mett in a natural casing, fresh Chorizo and fresh Italian, bratwurst,  cooked bockwurst, bierwurst and smoked andouille. Different sizes of wieners and dinner franks, sliced deli meats, ham, roast beef, and a few other items.

I did mine in a cast iron skillet and put a little char on them.  I do that to emulate a natural casing, as I prefer casings to skinless.  That’s just me. They go on a plain bun with yellow mustard and/or kraut.  Ingredients are beef and pork and seasonings (first one listed is mustard), but also corn syrup solids, and that’s not a personal preference of mine at all. Sweet and savory clash, in my mind. Overall, I liked it, and I’d buy it again and like to try some of their other products.

If you can’t find Queen City’s products at a store near you,  they are also available online. I purchased the 14 oz package which contains six sausages. Larger sizes are available.

The bottom picture below is Queen City’s factory, located in the part of the city that used to be known as “Porkopolis,” due to the large number of slaughter and packing houses in the ‘hood.

Queen City Smoked Sausage Review

Packaged

Queen City Smoked Sausage Review

In the skillet

Queen City Smoked Sausage Review

Queen City Factory

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Johnsonville Polish Kielbasa Review

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Johnsonville Polish Kielbasa ReviewI should read my own past reviews before I buy groceries.  I had a previous review of Johnson’s kielbasa, and gave it a fairly innocuous rating.  When I cooked heated some this week, I really didn’t like them, and if I remember that, won’t be likely to buy it again.  Any Eastern European version of kielbasa is a savory link, generally smoked, and highly  seasoned with garlic and/or pepper.

The predominant flavor in Johnsonville’s is not the smoke or spices, but a sweetness that probably comes from corn syrup as an ingredient, which doesn’t appeal to me and certainly doesn’t seem necessary.

(Day 2)  I tried these a second day, loading them up with condiments, one with yellow mustard, onion, dill  relish, another with sauerkraut and strong mustard.  Didn’t help, still the predominant taste to me is “sweet,” and that’s not what a polish should be.

If you’re buying groceries for young ‘uns, note that the fat content of each link is 30% of the RDA.  I’ll pass on these in the future.

Pictured below, Johnsonville’s Sheboygan Falls, WI plant, USDA est. # M34224-P34224.

Johnsonville Polish Kielbasa Review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johnsonville Polish Kielbasa Review

Johnsonville Polish Kielbasa Review

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