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Archive for the ‘Breakfast’ Category

Olympic Restaurant Review, Lake Geneva, WI

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Olympic Restaurant Review Lake Geneva(As Americans have become meaner, ruder, and armed) I no longer enjoy busy tourists areas, except in the off season, but I found myself in Lake Geneva, WI this week, as typical a tourist spot as any.

Feeling a might peckish, I was scoping out restaurants by how much I liked their exterior vintage neons, and opted for the Olympic, right downtown, a couple blocks from the lake.

It’s an old-timey coffee shop format, serving all three meals, with booths and tables. It’s also crowded, not with people, but with ‘stuff,’ and you’ll have to negotiate a path to the washrooms, for instance.

They have a HUGE menu, with enough variety to easily please any diner, and simultaneously overwhelm any kitchen. In other words, the menu is so long that most places are going to have to look for short cuts, and in the case of my selection, the “Meat Lovers Burger,”  it meant going with food service ingredients instead of fresh, prepared, in-house grub.

Yeah, I know, it’s a coffee shop. The burger came with fries (which were OK), and was around $10.50, adding cheese would slap on a buck.

Didn’t eat much of it, didn’t take it to go, either.  Service was “OK,”  there was one young woman for the entire dining room when I arrived, and she seemed a little harried.  Ambiance is a-ok.  Bathrooms are fairly clean.

Maybe I made a bad choice, maybe the kitchen was having an off day, but they weren’t very busy. There are sooooooooooooooo many options in Lake Geneva, for dining at all ends of the price spectrum. This is probably one you can skip.

I rarely read other reviews, but I checked a few as I was writing this, and some make reference to it’s an excellent place to eat when you’re drunk. I’ll keep that in mind.

Olympic Restaurant Review Lake Geneva

Meat Lovers Burger



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Olympic Family Restaurant Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Olympic Restaurant Review

Olympic Restaurant Review

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Chicken Fried Steak Recipe – Weekend Breakfasts At My House

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Chicken Fried Steak Recipe

Breaded steaks, ready to fry

When I was growing up, it was etched in stone  that the family had a big Saturday breakfast together; often my dad cooked the elaborate set-up, which might have been steak and eggs, pancakes or waffles, fruit turnovers, sausage or bacon.

It got so that friends of me and my siblings wanted to do sleepovers on Friday nites just for the morning repast.  Kids were placed in charge of beating batter, folding and stuffing turnovers, and most certainly, setting, clearing and washing.

I carried this on, when I had families. It was flexible tho, depending on people’s schedules, and would be either Saturday or Sunday. It is reportedly a fond memory of my daughters.

Even now, on my own, I continue the practice, but again, it’s not locked into a day.

Today I went with trying to perfect my chicken fried steak recipe, along with eggs and a home version of poutine.

For the steak, I used the flour/eggdip/crumb method, fried until the edges start to look a bit crispy – doesn’t take long!

Fare Buzz

My crumb mixture today was a combo of panko and crushed pretzels. I’ve tried all sorts of other combos – potato chips, saltines, corn chips. Most are probably too salty for most people.

For today’s poutine, I went with tator tots, brown gravy and feta. It was over the top satisfactory.

A couple poached eggs, and an everthing bagel. Ok, the bagel was a goof-up, cause I baked bread yesterday which I intended to use, and forgot I had put it in the icebox.

It was a good breakfast, large enough for two diners. Tried to share with the cat, but he would have nothing to do with it.

Chicken fried Steak recipe

Sunday breakfast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chicken Fried Steak Recipe

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Schwartz Family Restaurant Review, Eckerty, IN

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I saw the billboard on I-64 which promised “Amish cooking” and “everything made from scratch.”  I don’t know what the first term is supposed to refer to, but I do understand the second, and the Schwartz’s fell flat on that account.  I stopped for breakfast, and it may well have been made from “scratch” in the kitchens of Sysco.  The ads also touted “family style serving.”

I admire anybody in the restaurant biz – it’s tough going.  And this seems to be the perfect watering hole for the local rural community – meaning I am doubtful they get many tourists, it’s five miles off the interstate on a road to nowhere.

In retrospect, as I got further down (west) on I-64, there were quite a few billboards for “Amish” restaurants.

Here’s what I got out of the experience.  I had stopped for breakfast, which they serve on weekends only.  Apparently the balance of meal service, every day, is “cafeteria style,” which to me is not the same as “family style,” which I take to mean platters of food brought to the table for all to share, like I had in Wisconsin Dells at the Paul Bunyan Cook Shanty.  (mmm, platters of breakfast pork meats!).

The breakfast menu was limited. Egg dishes, biscuits and gravy (which seemed to be a popular order),  pancakes.  I ordered the “breakfast casserole,” an unusual choice for me. Scrambled eggs, bread crumbs, bacon, sausage, cheese, with hash browns and toast.

There weren’t that many customers, and there was an abundance of server help, but the food was slow, and sorry, folks, but nothing special. Like I implied above, I really don’t think that much of it was “from scratch.” Servers (which may have been all family members) were not very knowledgeable about the dishes.

Anyway, it was OK.  I can’t recommend it, really, but I can’t say “don’t go,” either.

They are customers of Sysco, that was evident from the condiments and other table products. And as I don’t care about healthy eating, I’d prefer butter on the table to “whipped topping.”

But maybe that’s what the Amish are known for.  I strongly suspect the lunch and dinner offerings would be much better.

Schwartz Family Restaurant Review

Breakfast Casserole

 

 

 

 

 

Schwartz Restaurant Menu
Schwartz Family Restaurant Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato
Schwartz Family Restaurant Review

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Thorntons Food Review, Part 2

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Thorntons Biscuit ReviewThe other day, I wrote about the new food offerings at Thorntons, a regional gas station chain, based out of Louisville.  I reviewed their pizza here.

At many locations in the chain, they offer hot snacks in addition to the usual roller grill selections; snacks include breakfast biscuits and burritos, hamburgers, tenders, tater crowns and the like.

Almost immediately after the post was up, I heard from the company’s PR firm (contact), a small concern in Louisville, KY. They took a slight exception to my calling the food “heat and eat,” as the company markets the offerings as “Made Fresh.”  Some of the marketing states “Made Fresh In House,” and the website states:  “Made Fresh Daily In the Store.”  There’s no mistaking what that last phrase says, but the first two could be open to some interpretation.  Further dissecting the website phrase, “Made Fresh,” to be sure, is pretty ambiguous, and I take a wee bit of exception to what exactly that phrase means.

I’m not picking on Thorntons, particularly, the marketing arms of the entire food industry tend to play fast and loose with English these days, and consumers can suffer.  A lot of words, and terms, are used loosely and freely, without have a specific, defined direct meaning.  I hate it when that happens!

Some examples:

Free range, cage free, organic, all natural, additive free, farm fresh, and so on.  For specific foods, phrases like “Angus Beef,”  “Kobe Beef,” and “Champagne.”  For me, I guess, its the senior moment equivalent of yelling “hey you kids, get off of my lawn.” (Yes, I know that makes absolutely no sense).Thorntons Biscuit Review

Because I suppose most of America doesn’t care. It’s not like you’re going to whiz past a 7-Eleven and race to Thorntons because 7-Eleven does not have a banner in its store window saying that their sandwiches and pizzas are “Made Fresh in House.”  Are you?  (In fact, many of 7-Elevens cooler sandwiches are made by a division of Lufthansa, the German airline).

No, we who partially exist on gas station food purchase primarily based on geographical convenience (“it’s here, I’m here, let’s eat), price, or selection variety). ‘Cause it comes down to personal taste, doesn’t it?  Hell, some people love Domino’s pizza.

Apparently for some companies (and I’m not naming names), “Made Fresh in House” is  acceptable usage for pre-assembled food products, thawed or heated up in the store.

Whereas to me “Made Fresh in House,” means raw ingredients are cooked, and assembled, in the store.  You know like, a) take pizza dough, b) slather on sauce and cheese, add toppings c) bake.

Today I tried the Thornton’s breakfast biscuit with bacon, egg and cheese.  It’s really no better or worse than any of the fast food biscuits. It’s cheaper, it was $2.59 at my store –   the area competitor’s products ring up at:

  • McDonalds  – 3.64
  • Burger King – 3.41
  • Chic-Fil-A – 2.95
  • Sonic  – 3.29 (with Texas toast, they don’t have  biscuits)

You can also get a side of taters at Thorntons, (tots, crowns, discs, whatever you call them) for 99 cents with a sandwich purchase. Not sure if that is for a limited time or not.  They didn’t really seem done, to me.  They weren’t crispy, anyway. (Although this will happen to any hot, crisp product placed in an enclosure – the steam that can’t escape kills the crispness).  I do love my tots, tho.

The flavor of the biscuit was OK.  The biscuit itself was  gummy. As if you bought a biscuit sandwich out of a cooler and did it in the microwave. Food is time/date stamped for “best by.”

Admittedly, the texture of food figures highly in making a list of favorites.

And that is why, of all the breakfast biscuits available in the United States, my favorite is from a Southern chicken chain called “Bojangles,” and for one simple reason.  They use REAL HAM.  Hard to find in almost any restaurant these days, impossible to find (except at Bojangles) in fast food joints, who across the board, opt for that chopped, pressed, formed deli “meat” crap.  Ick.

If biscuits are your thing, I have previously reviewed:

Advance Pierre (c-store cooler microwave product)

Larry the Cable Guys (frozen biscuits and gravy, dollar store)

Hardee’s Monster Biscuit

Pillsbury Heat and Eat

Burger King

Thorntons Biscuit Review

        Thorntons bacon egg cheese biscuit and tots

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thorntons Food Review

 

 

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Hummingbird Grill New Orleans

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Hummingbird New Orleans(The Hummingbird closed several years ago)

These days, some universities have “Entrepreneurs in Residence”,whatever that means. This morning, like most mornings, the Hummingbird Grill has P.O.I.R. (police officers in residence).

Other denizens include a couple of street people, a girl just off the Greyhound, suitcase by her side, tattered romance paperback in her hand, trying to make herself as small as possible to avoid eye or any other contact with anybody or anything in the Hummingbird, and me, accompanied as usual, by the New York Times crossword puzzle, and two Uniball Deluxe Fine Tip pens.

I’ve become a regular, which I guess means only that the nite waitress,Rusty, has seen me often enough that she brings my coffee w/o asking, and knows enough to call me by my nickname, “Hon.” (How DID she know that?)

It was kinda dicey sliding in to the Hummingbird this morning. I had to dodge the city workers who were power washing the sidewalk in front of the cafe – and in their “spare time”, washing a car or two. They must not be well paid, for in addition to supplementing their income with car washing, they helped themselves to a bundle of newspapers when I slipped my 50 cents into the Times-Picayune machine. Maybe they sell the papers to co-workers. Maybe they just use them to dry the cars. Styx was playing on the Seeburg as Randy took my order. I usually go for the “Early Bird Special”, which is available 24 hours, so I’m not sure what the name means. It’s 3 eggs, choice of ham, bacon, sausage, and grits or potatoes, toast or biscuit. A bargain at 4.00. Coffee extra, no charge for water.

One of the regular “troublemakers” wandered in and sat at an unbussed table and started eating off the plates that had been left there. Randy has developed a sure-fire method (according to her) of dealing with these types of patrons, by proclaiming loudly “the person that was eating those pancakes has AIDS!” Seems to do the trick and helps clear the room without having to bother the P.O.I.R.

It appears to take five people to run the night shift at the Hummingbird. In addition to Rusty, there’s the cook, who does a marvelous job of juggling several cast iron pans on a 12”x12” gas grill. He never talks, you don’t talk to him. Even if you are sitting at the counter, Rusty takes your order and passes it on to him. Union rules, maybe lol? There’s a ‘mop boy’, a dishwasher in back, and a cashier. With your change, the cashier is fond of giving out financial advice. I think he’s going to be the subject of the next TV commercial for that E-stock broker that ran the ad about the two truck driver that owned an island. Heed the advice of the sign at the cashier: “No talking to invisible people.”

The low end of the menu is an order of grits for 1.35, Well, actually a side of gravy (brown) is only 1.05, but I haven’t seen anybody order that.The high end is an open-faced turkey sandwich with mashed potatoes, gravy, dinner salad and roll for 7.50. It’s available Sundays only. In between the high and low price range, you’ll find the usual greasy spoon fare, everything from fried egg sandwiches to 1/2 Fried Chicken dinner. Is that half-fried, or half a chicken?

Chile-cheese fries weigh in at 2.60 and off the Richter scale in fat and cholesterol. I can never figure out the difference between chile” and “chili”, beyond knowing that in this case, they really mean “chili.”

Most big-city greasy spoons have a certain element of “charm.” The Hummingbird seems to have been absent from school the day they passedcharm out. But I like it. It’s a good place to listen to people’s stories in the middle of the night, or imagine you’re playing a role in that Paul Simon song “laughing on the bus, playing games with the faces….we said the man in the gabardine suit was a spy…” The sun started to peak Hummingbird New Orleansthrough the smoke-stained window at the cafe as Carl Palmer and Steve Howe’s voices wafted from the jukebox their terrific harmonies in the 1982 hit “Heat of the Moment” from the group Asia. Not as interesting as the material from their days in ‘Emerson, Lake, and Palmer’ or ‘Yes’, respectively, but a nice ditty for a piece someone my age  would label as “new music.”

Most days I miss the past. At places like the Hummingbird, I get to relive it every night. Catch the crew of the Hummingbird nightly at 804 St. Charles, 24/7. Catch Asia on tour this winter if you find yourselves in cities like Lorsch, Germany.

If I were Don Henley, I’d find something romantic to write about the Hummingbird, the way he did about the “Sunset Grill” in LA. But even the Sunset Grill is not what it was, in LA they tear down anything that is more than 20 years old, and the Sunset Grill today is a gleaming new white stucco building, instead of the dilapidated old shack with stools on the sidewalk with all its old charm.

The Hummingbird is just old. Charm costs extra these days. Sometimes for me, just ‘old’ is charm enough.

 

Hummingbird Grill New Orleans

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Waffle House Review

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waffleI wrote a piece years back, after hitting a Waffle House shortly after 9/11.   I recently dropped in on one on the Gulf Coast.  BTW, I counted on a map, and there are about 30 in a 40 mile stretch along the coasts of MS and LA.  Wow.

I sat at the counter, sipping my Joe, and indulged in some bacon and eggs, cooked as ordered, with a smattering of cheese on the hash browns.

If you haven’t been to a Waffle House, they are a chain across the South, with diminutive facilities, and a menu focused on breakfast, a few sandwiches, and a couple of entrees.  If you’re so inclined, you can even get a T-bone there for around $10.  Breakfasts run in the $3-$4 range. The chain is particularly proud of their hash browns, which you can ordered “smothered, covered, chunked, diced, peppered, capped, topped, or country.” The descriptions all refer to different add-on ingredients, and the taters are available in three different portion sizes.  They have not come up with a word (unless there is a secret menu) which would refer to ordering the hash browns with all of those additions.  They should.

My breakfast and coffee were just fine, they are big on consistency, and as such, a very dependable road stop. They have over 2000 locations in 25 states; they started in 1955 in Georgia.

The company hasn’t avoided controversy over the years, with a couple of religious and racial issues receiving some attention, but it seems behind them.

Find the one nearest you with their locator.

Waffle House Review

Waffle House Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Waffle House Review

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Country Hearth Motel Review

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Country Hearth ReviewHaving spent thousands of nights on the road in my career, I’d thought I had tried virtually every hotel/motel chain in existence, but apparently I missed one, “Country Hearth Inn & Suites.”

Not sure where it started, but their website boast sez: “Country Hearth Inn & Suites lodging system consists of over 100 properties and thousands of rooms in the United States, Canada, and India. The brand features a bed and breakfast feel with the convenience of modern, well-appointed rooms and suite accommodations, complimentary breakfast, and free local calls.”

Is “free local calls” even a draw anymore?  For that matter, why do they have phones in motel rooms at all?

Rolling down I-55, I booked a room at the Sikeston outlet of Country Hearth, pre-booked only because it was holiday travel time, and I knew I wanted to spend the night there cause I planned on eating at Lambert’s Cafe.  In any case, booking online, I actually paid MORE than the locally advertised rate. Doh!

Franchise motels are a risky business, both for the operator and franchisor.  The upsides for the operator include brand name awareness, reservations system, and probably back-end technology.  The downside for the franchisor is having a lack of quality control.

I would have been happier with the accommodations if I paid the locally advertised rate, instead of 25% more. At the rate I did pay, I know I could have found a cleaner, more comfortable room nearby.

And this is going to sound terribly politically incorrect, but it’s a  simple fact for this motel – that the entire property smelled like curry.  Not all that appealing.  The complimentary breakfast was pretty skimpy as well.

With the value priced franchises – it’s always gonna be a crap shoot if it’s a miserable, ok, or great experience.  Depends entirely on the operator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Country Hearth Motel Review

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Art & Almas Century Inn – The $100 Breakfast, Burlington, IL

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Art * Alma's Century Inn

                      Exterior

The “$100 hamburger” is a concept, excuse, private pilots use for the equivalent of a leisurely Sunday drive; fuel up the private plane, fly someplace, eat a burger, dessert, or whatever. The $100 refers to the cost of operating the plane for that trip.

This weekend, I “discovered” a morning meal worthy of being called the “$100 Breakfast,” and whether you’re out for a Sunday drive or flight, Art & Alma’s Century Inn, in Burlington, IL, is worth your money, time and effort.

Burlington is roughly 50 miles west of Chicago’s loop, and 40 miles east of Rockford.  (There are actually a half dozen airports within five miles, if you’re actually contemplating a flight, map below).

The restaurant has been open in one form or another since 1908, and currently serves dinner six nights, and breakfast/brunch on Sundays.

This breakfast may well deserve the ‘subtitle’ of “the $35 breakfast,” as that’s about what you would pay for it at any fine hotel.  Start off your Sunday with one of the Inn’s 25 unique Bloody Mary recipes, before launching into perfectly cooked to order breakfasts, including a half dozen varieties of “Benedicts.”

I went with the “Country Boy,” which had diced sausage and bacon, a generous slab of ham, poached eggs with country gravy atop biscuits.  My pal opted for the “Mein Schatzi,” bacon, swiss, poached eggs, hollandaise and sour cream resting on potato pancakes.  There are ‘cakes, hash, french toast, and plenty of sides to choose from – later in the morning, they add sandwiches to the Sunday brunch menu.

The food was presently promptly, nice plating, cooked to perfection and the taste and flavors reflected quality ingredients. Two breakfasts, two coffees, less than $25.  Pleasant, historical ambiance, and great service, as well.

No question, hands down, my best meal of 2015, at any price.  Can’t wait to get back and try the dinner. Classic fish fry on Friday nights, and Prime Rib special, Wed, Fri, Saturday while it lasts.

Great job, Chef!

 

Art & Almas Century Inn

                        Country Boy Benedict

Art & Almas Century Inn

                               Hand Crafted Bar

Art & Almas Century Inn

                                Nearby Airstrips

Art & Alma's Century Inn Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato
Art & Almas Century Inn

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Pub 72 Review, Gilberts, IL

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I’ve been on a mission to have weekend breakfasts at rural locations in Illinois, and today we hit the Pub 72 Bar & Grill in Gilberts, IL. The “72” is after the number of the highway, and if memory serves me, is a rather new name. Not sure if the change also represented a change in ownership.

The place has a menu with “something for everything” whether you’re in the mood for plate dinners, sandwiches, appetizers, pizza, or adult beverage drink specials.

They serve a VERY economical breakfast (beginning at $2.99) on Saturdays and Sundays from 9 AM.

This is one of those joints were seemingly every employee took a course in what being in the hospitality business truly means. You’re almost always greeted by the owner when you walk in, a guy who doesn’t think so much of himself that it would be beneath him to walk around, refill coffees, inquire to customers satisfaction, and be observant enough to notice patrons that need attention.  Superb. Rare qualities in most smaller places these days.

Serving help was equally affable, smiles all around, diligent order taking, great follow-up.  By 9:30, the place was pretty busy with Sunday morning diners.

I had ham steak and eggs, great piece of ham with a nice grill char on it, just the way I like it.  And a slice of Texas toast. As is the fashion at small diners in Illinois, a bowl of butter pats grazes each table.  Eggs cooked precisely as ordered.

Hash browns are above average too.

I’ll be back.  You should check them out if you live in the area, or are tooling down I-90 some day.

Directions

Pub 72 Bar & Grill review

              Ham, Eggs, Texas Toast

 

 

Pub 72 Review

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Farmer Johns Sausage Review

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Farmer John Sausage ReviewI’ve never been much for “brown and serve” type breakfast sausages; to me, they have always represented one of the main components of civic group and church pancake breakfasts, huge chafing trays of the little pork links.

But it’s hard to pass up any processed pork product that is selling for around $2 a pound these days, less than half what you would pay for other breakfast meats, whether your favorites are bacon, ham, or smoked or patty sausage.

Farmer Johns Original Breakfast sausage are always a buck for a 1/2 pound package at Dollar Tree and most club stores.  Fairly often, they are on sale for even less.  So that’s a deal.

They are “skinless,” and they are not pre-cooked, so prep will take you 10-15 minutes on the stove top or under the broiler.  No one recommends microwaving them.

Farmer Johns is an L.A. company, located in Vernon, just south of downtown LA. They’ve been around since 1931, and make the full range of processed pork products: bacon, sausage, hot dogs, lunch meat, hams…….including the local favorite “Dodger Dog,”  sold at Dodger stadium and in retail outlets.  The factory (USDA est. 360) (pictured below) is “famous” for its extensive murals depicting rural life. They are now part of Hormel.

The ingredients for the breakfast sausage are straightforward: Pork, water, sodium lactate, less than 2 % salt, dextrose, surgar, flavorings, BH, propyl gallate, citric acid. I’m happy that list doesn’t include any configuration of corn syrup solids, or mechanically separated poutltry.

This product may have changed my mind about having them in the regular breakfast rotation, especially at this price.  Plus, since they are not in casings, if they are thawed, you can smoosh them into patties, if you prefer your pork intake in that shape!

The flavor is good, not very seasoned, so great appeal for the mass market.  They also offer  a “maple flavor” variety.

Farmer John Sausage Review

In the box

Farmer John Sausage Review

In the skillet 10 minutes

Farmer John Sausage Review

Dodger Dogs Retail Packaging

Farmer John Sausage Review

Farmer John Factory

 

 

Farmer Johns Sausage Review

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