Gramma’s Kitchen Review – Walcott Iowa

Gramma's Kitchen Review

Gramma’s Kitchen Review

If you’ve ever driven across Iowa on Interstate 80 (Mainstreet USA), you’ve either stopped at this exit or at least noticed the signage for “The World’s Largest Truck Stop.”  Yep, it’s at this exit.  But that’s not where I stopped this trip, I stopped across the road at Gramma’s Kitchen because two years it ago, it made the list of the best tenderloins in the state, according to the Iowa Pork Producers.

So what exactly is a tenderloin?  It’s a boneless pork chop, smashed with a hammer or other blunt instrument until it’s enlarged and very thin, the drenched in a coating or batter, deep-fried, plopped onto a bun entirely too small for the piece of meat, and dressed up with pickles, onions, and occasionally mayo.

I opted for tots on the side, pickle was included, a damn fine one, too, crispy half-sour.

The sandwich was perfect, crispy coating, but the meat was still juicy inside. Bakery style bun, soft yet substantial enough to hold the ample cut of meat.

The tots were piping hot, right from the fryer, and lightly seasoned.  I hated “baked” tots, not crispy enough.  If your tot hasn’t got crunch, why get them?

The restaurant has an attached bar with an abbreviated menu, and throughout the building are Iowa souvenirs as well as some preserves and the like.

As is my habit, I grabbed a colorful souvenir magnet, even tho I have no place to put them anymore, my frig is stainless steel.

Take a gander at Gramma’s menus and start planning your next road trip.  Oh, almost forgot, you don’t have to get the tenderloin battered and fried, most places will happily grill one for you instead.

Gramma's Kitchen Review

Fried Pork Tenderloin Sandwich with Tater Tots

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gramma’s Kitchen Review

Gramma’s Kitchen Review

Nanas New York Deli Review – Crystal Lake, IL

Nanas New York Deli
Nanas New York Deli Review

“Ga-Ba-Goo” Italian sub

Nanas New York Deli Review: Tiny take-out featuring “New York Style” overstuffed sandwiches. The “Waldorf” is corned beef, pastrami, swiss, Russian, and slaw on marble rye.  Exceptional deli meats.

The “Gabba-Goo”  is salami, mortadella, hot capicola, lettuce, tomato, onion, vinegar, and oil on an 8-inch roll.  Again, exceptional on the meats.

The slaw is creamy and the vegetables in it crisp. Pickle included with the sandwiches is you ask, kind of a half-sour, and half size, larger than a gherkin, smaller than a big kosher dill.

Build your own is an option, of course, choosing from a variety of breads, meats, cheese, vegetables.  Soup, salads, and hot dogs round out the menu.

Half dozen flavors of chips from Deep River chips in Connecticut and bottle drinks, Pepsi products.

Couple of tables inside and on the sidewalk if you can’t wait until you get home to gobble these beauties.  Menu below or online.  Click to enlarge.

Nanas New York Deli Review: Tiny take-out featuring “New York Style” overstuffed sandwiches. The “Waldorf” is corned beef, pastrami, swiss, Russian, and slaw on marble rye.  Exceptional deli meats.

The “Gabba-Goo”  is salami, mortadella, hot capicola, lettuce, tomato, onion, vinegar, and oil on an 8-inch roll.  Again, exceptional on the meats.

The slaw is creamy and the vegetables in it crisp. Pickle included with the sandwiches is you ask, kind of a half-sour, and half size, larger than a gherkin, smaller than a big kosher dill.

Build your own is an option, of course, choosing from a variety of breads, meats, cheese, vegetables.  Soup, salads, and hot dogs round out the menu.

Half dozen flavors of chips from Deep River chips in Connecticut and bottle drinks, Pepsi products.

Couple of tables inside and on the sidewalk if you can’t wait until you get home to gobble these beauties.  Menu below or online.  Click to enlarge.

Nanas New York Deli Review

Menu Page 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nanas New York Deli Review

Menu Page 2

 

Nanas New York Deli Review

BBQ King Smokehouse Review – Huntley, IL

BBQ King Smokehouse Review

 

BBQ King Smokehouse Review

A friend wanted to check this place out, had never had brisket before and wanted to see what all the hubbub was about.  So we drove out to the Huntley edition of the BBQ King Smokehouse, we could have opted for his other location, in Woodstock IL, as well.  This one is newer.

We knew we were going to get the food to go, there’s a nice park/town square in Huntley, and it was a great day for a picnic lunch.

I’ve been lucky to have been to some of the great BBQ centers in the US, including five of the restaurants in Lockhart, TX, and a number of them along the Historic NC BBQ Trail, including BBQ Center in Lexington, as well as stops in Memphis, St Louis and the rest.

I’m not comparing this place to any of those.

I started with the oversized pretzel for $6, “glazed with butter and salt” and a side of “our house-made cheese sauce.”  It was the doughy type of pretzel, no exterior crispness. The cheese has some bite to it. The pretzel served me was devoid of any salt.

I ordered a hamburger, with bacon, cheddar, lettuce, tomato, and onion.  Each “topping” was 75 cents, so that added nearly $4.00 to an $11 burger. Included with sandwiches are fries and a couple of bites of slaw.

The burger patty itself was good enough, “100% beef brisket” the menu claims. The bun was bakery soft, but ample enough to hold the toppings.

The fries are the extruded variety, and if you’re a regular reader, you already know those aren’t my favorites. I can’t imagine why any restaurant uses them. Price? Speed of cooking?

Salad Anyone?

My coleslaw was non-descript, neither sweet, tangy, or creamy.  Curiously, the dressing on mine was white, the dressing on my friend’s serving was yellow.  There’s a “Q” place in the Mississippi delta, Abe’s, I swear has the best slaw on the planet, and he swears the only ingredients are sugar and vinegar.  I don’t believe him.  (Abe’s has been open since 1924 and is located in Clarksdale, MS at the famous “Crossroads” where Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil in exchange for becoming a guitar virtuoso). (So the story goes).  It’s only a ten-hour drive if you feel the urge.

On to the brisket.  Sandwich came with fries, slaw, and cornbread. In my experience, brisket should be the star of any BBQ joint.  It’s what some people work for years to perfect.

This shredded beef lacked much smoke flavor and was relatively sauceless.  The texture was good, it was a nice cut of meat.

Finally, our “to-go bag” was missing the following:  cutlery, salt/pepper, napkins, sauce, butter, or honey for the cornbread.

There were two tables in use when we walked in, and one server. She did a good enough job and was very pleasant.

Why a burger for me?  I like to see how restaurants do with menu items that aren’t their specialty.

I have friends who swear by this place, they just love it.  You probably will too.  All restaurants are having a tough time during the “difficulty,” but especially local mom and pops.  Give them your biz, whether you choose to dine in, carry out, or have delivery.

 

 

Menu.

Catering Menu.

 

 

 

 

BBQ King Smokehouse Woodstock Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato
BBQ King Smokehouse Review

BBQ King Smokehouse Review

Asadoras Argentinas Burgers Review – Oswego, IL

Asadoras Argentinas Burgers Review
Asadoras Argentinas Burgers Review

Tipcia Burger

My Asadoras Argentinas Burgers  Review comes with a spoiler. It’s terrific!

I’ve had a great deal of satisfaction lately in exploring unique restaurants in small towns in the Upper Midwest.  You stumble on to them and are almost tempted to say “what the heck is that doing here?”

Such was the case in Oswego, IL, and finding Asadoras Argentinas Burgers. Oswego is 45 miles west of downtown Chicago, just off I-88. A bit more from Rockford, IL, 72 miles Southeast, I-39 to I-88.

Asadoras (Spanish for “roasted” or “grilled”) serves char-grilled hand-pattied burgers (about 1/3 pound, at least) with Argentinian style toppings, somewhat adapted for the American palate. We tried the Criolla Burger, which was topped with Mozzarella, salsa criolla, and chimichurri mayonnaise.  Burger number two was the “Tipica,” topped with lettuce tomato, honey ham, cheddar, fried egg, and red bell pepper strips.

Both were superb.  Cooked perfectly, perched on an ultra-soft bakery roll that was still firm enough to hold the ingredients without collapsing in your hands. (Don’t you hate it when that happens? I sure do!)

The primary side is a very unique extruded fry, which they call “side wedges.”  By extruded, I mean these are made from a potato slurry and pushed through a mold to gain their unique shape.  Very crispy on the outside, and pillowy inside, we opted for the chimichurri style, so the fries were decorated with dollops of the famous chimichurri sauce, as unique an Argentinian condiment as you can find.

Asadoras Argentinas Burgers Review

Chimichurri Fries

Although it’s served throughout the Western hemisphere now, its roots are solidly Argentinian, but by way of (most common story), a British soldier stationed there in the early 19th century. It’s (usually) a melange of finely chopped parsley, garlic, pepper, oregano, vinegar, and olive oil.

The unique shape of the fries holds the condiment well.  You can also opt for regular fries, paprika fries, or cheddar bacon. Optional side sauces include Criolla, Avocado Mayo, and Poblano.

There are other sandwiches, and wings on the menu, a vegetarian sandwich and a kid’s menu.

If you’re a fan of great burgers, this is worth a stop. Very friendly and helpful staff, too!   Facebook page.

 

Here’s the burger menu, click to enlarge.

Asadoras Argentinas Burgers Review

 

 

 

Asadoras Argentinas Burgers Review
Asadoras Argentinas Burgers Review

Smittys Pork Tenderloin Review – Leonore, IL

Smittys Pork Tenderloin Review

Smittys Pork Tenderloin Review

Smittys Pork Tenderloin ReviewThe pork tenderloin, also known as BPT (b is for breaded) is a popular sandwich in the Upper Midwest, particularly in Iowa and Indiana. And occasionally in Illinois.  It’s similar to Wienerschnitzel.

A pork cutlet is cut and then smashed to make it larger and thinner, dipped in breading, sometimes cornmeal, panko, crushed saltines and deep-fried.  It is usually served on a hamburger bun, garnished with any or all: tomatoes, lettuce, mayo, pickles, onions.  Frequently accompanied by fries as a side.

There’s been a friendly competition among purveyors to lay claim to the title of “the largest,” and certainly in Illinois the small town of Smitty’s in Leonore, takes the title. Leonore is a booming locale south of Lasalle-Peru, 100 miles West of Chicago.  Population 13o.

I rolled down there on a Saturday, aiming to beat the lunch “crowd” so I called in my order (still, as of this date, curbside service only).

Both I and the sandwich arrived at the same time, and like those who have gone before, I agree, this baby is YUGE.

And delicious. Proper amount of breading, gently seasoned, good quality pork taste and texture.  Excellent pickles and fresh cut onions.  There are tables outdoor for diners to enjoy their BPT’s or other items until the interior opens up again.

Worth a drive.

Iowa has an entire “Tenderloin” you can try and conquer.

I’ve written about tenderloins on the trail and also in Indiana.

Go on, go for it.  You know you want to!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smittys Pork Tenderloin Review

Smittys Pork Tenderloin Review

St Charles Tavern Review New Orleans LA

St Charles Tavern Review New Orleans LA

St Charles Tavern Review New Orleans LA

SPOILER ALERT: Written with attitude. I used to go here A LOT. It became my go-to 24-hour place after another favorite, the Hummingbird closed. New Orleans is a strange town in that for being known as “party central” there’s never been a lot of late-night dining.  It’s changing gradually.

To the subject at hand. I used to go to the St Charles because they had a lengthy menu and among the 24-hour selections was breakfast and muffalettas.  Two things I hold near and dear.

For those of you not familiar with the muffaletta, it’s a New Orleans creation, Italian in nature, on a large round loaf, with Italian cold cuts, cheese, and olive salad. I’ve reviewed and explained its history a number of times here and here.  Have also previously written about this joint, the St. Charles, as well.

The Mighty Muffaletta

So here’s the deal on this sandwich.  You can get it all over town in some variation or another. Some serve it hot, some cold, some change up the olive salad recipe a little bit, some change the bread a little bit.  But in every location bar none, you are served the whole sandwich, unless you order a half, which a few places offer. That’s a half in the photograph above, but not from the St. Charles. At each of these aforementioned locations, the entire sandwich will cost you between $8 – $13.

Having been to the St Charles so many times in the past, I was confident stopping by, even tho it had been a while since I visited.  A friend cautioned “they’ve changed” but left it at that, with the implication the joint was going more “upmarket.”

I went in with a friend, about 9pm, place was about 1/4 full, and a few at the bar, took some time to get the server’s attention, menus and give drink orders.

Ordered the muff, my friend the red beans and rice (which require the purchase of an additional protein accompaniment, sausage or catfish. (????).

After way too long, the sandwich plate was brought to the table, placed in front of me, and I nicely inquired “where’s the rest of it?” (She had brought a quarter sandwich, and about 7 french fries).  “I didn’t order a quarter,” sez I.  “Oh, that’s the way we’ve always served it,” sez she.  Right. Did you hear my eyes roll?

Contemplate the sandwich  sitting in front of me, while we waited for the red beans, another very traditional Louisiana dish.  And waited. Waited. Waited some more.  After several additional reminders from me to the server, and plenty of “it’ll be right out” replies, it arrived more than 30 minutes after the sandwich (did I mention it was only a quarter of a sandwich? Imagine getting a quarter of a club sandwich).

The sausage was burnt and the beans were cooked past the point of oblivion.  $15 for that.  $10 for the quarter sandwich. Drinks. Really, she expects a tip?

The people working that night were “not all there” – is the most polite way I can say it.

I won’t be back.  I advise you to steer clear as well.  There’s a half dozen restaurants within one block of the St Charles.

 

 

St. Charles Tavern Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

St Charles Tavern Review New Orleans LA

Dinos Pizza Review – NW Suburban Chicago Illinois

Dinos Pizza Review - NW Suburban Chicago Illinois

Dinos Pizza Review – NW Suburban Chicago Illinois

Dinos Pizza Review - NW Suburban Chicago IllinoisThere still exists a “Little Italy” near downtown Chicago, but there’s not much Italian left to it, ‘cept or a once a year weekend festival. No, for me, Chicago’s “Little Italy” is more likely to be found around Harlem Avenue, south of I-90, in the NW suburbs of Norwood Park, Norridge, and Harwood Heights.

Got to be more pizza joints per square mile than anywhere else in Chicago.  I’m counting 16, and that’s not including the Italian deli/groceries,  of which there are several.

I’ve made the journey to the delis before, notably (reviews) “Nottoli” and “Rex.”  If I was forced to choose one or the other to patronize the rest of my life, it would be a very close call, but “Rex” would win out.  They have fewer groceries than Nottoli, but more hot “to go” meals, and for me, their meatballs are way ahead of Nottoli’s.

All that being said, there are 16 pizza places to check out, and one, in particular, I’ve wanted to hit for a long time.  Officially named “Dino’s Italian Restaurant” I suspect most patrons go for the pizza.  They have been around for over 60 years and that’s always a plus for me.

I ordered to take-out, but the joint was bustling for a post lunchtime Saturday afternoon, and it was one of those places where everyone seems to know each other. (“Hi, Norm!”).

Servers were affable, eager to please, and knew how to do their jobs.

The interior is homey and ‘neighborhood-y.’  Boy, I am making up the words today.

The Pizza

On to the pizza. I fully realize every person has their own preferences for pizza, and in Chicago, we have so many choices. Thick crust, deep dish, stuffed crust, double crust, pan,  sausage crust, no crust, and the one I prefer, a thin crust referred to in many local establishments as “tavern-style.”

Using Italian pastry/pizza flour (many places use regular flour, which for me, doesn’t give a great outcome, the ideal thin crust pizza sports a crust that is cracker-like, but not flakey.

It has some good “chew” to it, and because tavern-style pizza is cut in squares instead of triangular slices, there’s no “hang,” that is, the cheese and toppings aren’t going to slide off your slice when you pick it up.

Dinos Pizza Review - NW Suburban Chicago Illinois

16″ thin crust pizza with sausage

For my taste, Dino’s is perfect.

A medium application of flavorful tomato sauce, not too much, not to skimpy, and it tastes like (surprise!) tomatoes!  Too often pizza joints use sauce that has corn syrup solids as fill, and it becomes ultra-sweet – if it’s your thing, find, it’s just not for me.

Ample cheese, real cheese, again, not the kind blended with fillers.  Nice stretch, great taste, well melted.

Finally, the topping.  I went simple, Italian sausage.  Fantastic.  Hand-pulled chunks of sausage with fennel and garlic, great texture, nice size, not those god-awful preformed sausage pellets so many places use.

I bought the pizza to take home, a 40 minute drive, laid it carefully in the back area of the SUV. Thought I’d just sneak a peek before driving off. Damn, the aroma.  Ok, maybe one slice before I go.

Back in the driver’s seat, slice devoured, “Ok, maybe just one more.”

Managed some self-restraint after that second slice and drove away.  OK, I managed for about ten minutes.  Then another ten minutes.  A stop for a cola. Then another ten minutes.  And by the time I pulled into my driveway, the massive, 16-inch pie I had purchased has shrunk by half.  Oops.

Dino’s Italian Restaurant has a very lengthy menu that includes appetizers,  sandwiches, salads, soups, pasta, chicken dinners, fish, ribs, veal, steak and dessert.  You can see it online here, or there is the pizza page below.

Heck yes I will return. But next time I’ll know well enough to get one for the ride, one for home!

 

Dinos Pizza Review - NW Suburban Chicago Illinois

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dino's Italian Restaurant Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato
Dinos Pizza Review – NW Suburban Chicago Illinois

Dinos Pizza Review – NW Suburban Chicago Illinois

Rex Italian Foods Review – Norridge, IL

Rex Italian Foods Review - Norridge, IL

Rex Italian Foods Review – Norridge, IL

Rex Italian Foods Review - Norridge, ILCouple of years ago, I was driving down one of the major north/south surface streets in Chicago, Harlem Avenue.  It’s one of the streets chock-a-block full of ethnic eating and grocery establishments, primarily Polish, but more than a couple of old-timey Italian joints.  I stopped at one, Nottoli’s, a few times in the time since that drive, they have a great selection of imported groceries and a delicious meat counter.  Here’s what I wrote about it.

I had heard about, but not visited another joint close by, Rex Italian Foods, which has counter service to eat in or take out, plus a whole host of prepared Italian specialties in bulk to take home.

I went to purchase stuff to take home, but got caught up in the energy of the regulars who were ordering food, so I had to take the plunge.  Modestly dipping my toe in, so to speak, got an order of meatballs, a side of garlic bread, and a San Pellegrino to taste.  Companion went with a Caprese Panini which she raved about.

We then loaded up on a half dozen prepared dishes to tote home, along with a few pounds of Italian sausage, some olives, and olive salad to adorn muffalettas next time I’m feeling ambitious.

I regret not purchasing more, cause it is kind of a hike from me to thee.

The meatballs were delicious, great texture, pork/beef maybe, strong flavor of herbs and fennel.  Just the way I like them, and I’m tough to please, because I make damn fine meatballs at home.  Damn fine.

I will return. I have to.  They stuff their own sausage and cook their home Italian beef.  And have been for the past sixty years or so.

Here’s a quick look inside, courtesy the daughter of the late Chicago Bear’s legend, Walter Payton.

 

Complete menu below, click on pages for better view. Catering available.  Order online for take-out.
Rex Italian Foods Review - Norridge, IL

Rex Italian Foods Review - Norridge, IL

Rex Italian Foods Review - Norridge, IL

 

Rex Italian Foods Review - Norridge, IL

Rex Italian Foods Review - Norridge, IL

Rex Italian Foods Review - Norridge, IL

 

 

Rex Italian Foods Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato
Rex Italian Foods Review – Norridge, IL

Rex Italian Foods Review – Norridge, IL

 

Devanco Gyro Sandwich Kit Review

Devanco Gyro Kit Review

Devanco Gyro Sandwich Kit Review

As ubiquitous in Chicago as hot dogs or pizza, the gyro (however you choose to pronounce it, ”yero’, ‘jy-ro’, ‘geer-o’) is a sandwich of Greek origin consisting of vertically spit-roasted meat, cucumber sauce, onion, and tomato on a split or folded pita.

The name comes from the Greek word which means “turn” – a description of the meat roasting on the revolving vertical spit. The meat is thin sliced and placed into the folded pita with the condiments. The documented history of the sandwich dates back to the 19th century.

Chicago’s Devanco Foods is one of several large suppliers of gyro sandwich fixings; they supply to both restaurants and package in retail for purchase by consumers at groceries. The kits are “heat and eat” affairs, weighing in at one and a quarter pounds, and priced in the $6-7 range, for the smaller kit.

What’s Inside

The company makes two sizes of these kits. Contents in the smaller one include three pitas, 6 ounces of tzatziki (cucumber) sauce, and 8 ounces of gyro meat, which is beef, lamb, breadcrumbs, flavoring, and spices.  The kit is supposed to make three sandwiches, which comes out to about two bucks each, considerably less than restaurant pricing. Consumers may add tomatoes and onions to their sandwich, which they must supply from their home pantry.

The product is sold frozen (hard) and can be thawed overnight in the refrigerator. Or not. Further instructions allow for heating the thawed product in the microwave or in a skillet on a stovetop. The box further directs consumers to place ‘about’ 5 slices of meat in each sandwich. ( went with four), but was overly generous with the sauce.

Devanco Gyro Sandwich Kit Review

Assembled, prior to folding

Growing up in a small town in the Midwest, I wasn’t aware of gyros until the advent of adulthood, and later, when work took me to the Middle East, the variations became a favorite. The sandwiches were also quite plentiful when I lived in Paris, in the 10th, as our neighbors were primarily Turkish and there were a lot of shawarma/gyro shops in the neighborhood.

In addition to gyro fixings, Devanco makes other Chicago favorites, including Ditka’s Italian Beef (review), Italian Sausage, Barbecued Beef, frozen burgers from Chicago’s famous Billy Goat Tavern, and various types of Giardiniera, a pickled vegetable mix Chicagoans enjoy on hot dogs and other sandwiches.

As always, I went with stovetop prep, believing “slow and low” the key to success in the kitchen, most of the time.  I did add tomatoes and onions to my pita, which are not included.

Will you notice much of a difference between these heat and eat versions and ones you’d purchase at a shop?  Not really.  One exception would be at a shop you can ask for ‘crispy’ bits of meat, and some shops add lettuce, which I eschew on any sandwich. Devanco’s meat is tasty, they include an ample amount of cucumber sauce, and their pitas are about as good as any anywhere. Funny, near my old house in Portland there are some hummus shops, and the one that specializes in hummus has the worst pita and chips I’ve ever consumed anywhere.

Would I buy the kit again?  Absolutely!  Tasty food, great value.

Devanco Gyro Sandwich Kit Review

Included ingredients

 

Devanco Gyro Sandwich Kit Review

Devanco’s Suburban Chicago Factory

 

 

 

 

 

Devanco Gyro Sandwich Kit Review

Devanco Gyro Sandwich Kit Review

 

Gyradiko Restaurant Review – Carpentersville, IL

Gyradiko Restaurant Review

Gyradiko Restaurant Review – Carpentersville, IL

Gyradiko Restaurant ReviewI will always support “mom and pop” local businesses over chains, and am happy when they thrive.  Gyradiko has been open awhile in a strip mall in Carpentersville, IL (NW suburb of Chicago).

Gyradiko’s subheading is “Greek Street Food” and not only do they offer that, they also serve “Chicago Street Food” –  Italian Beef, Burgers, Chicago style hot dogs.

I ordered the gyro combo, which includes the pita/meat sandwich, fries, and a drink.  The gyro sandwich is spit-roasted meat in a pita with Greek tzatziki sauce (yogurt/cucumber or dill), tomatoes, and onions.  It is derived from the ‘doner kabob.’ In Greece, the meat is usually lamb.  In the US, generally, there is a choice of beef/lamb mix, chicken, or pork belly, sometimes al pastor.  I went with the traditional preparation.

There are only a few suppliers of gyro meat cones in the Chicago area, so you won’t find much difference in taste or texture from different eateries.  Where you will find a difference is in the quantity of meat, and Gyradiko loads it on.  I mean, really loads it on.  You’ll experience similar generosity in the massive serving of their fresh-cut fries (SO GOOD!). You can see the pile of fries in my picture, even tho the quantity has been diminished because I couldn’t quit eating them on the way home.

I will go back.  He offers a grilled chicken topped with Saganaki (seared Greek cheese).  There used to be a place across town that offered a burger with that cheese topping it.  I’ll see if Gyradiko would be open to making that up for me.  I suspect they will.  Next visit I’ll ask for more tzatzik on the side.  So fresh. Be an excellent fry dip!

Full menu.

The restaurant is located in the strip mall at 142 S. Western Ave., Carpentersville, Illinois 60110 and is open for lunch and dinner, seven days.  It’s at the far north end of the strip mall that also has Big Lots, Firestone, or just South of Aldi. Western Avenue is also State Highway 31.

Each day one of the menu items is discounted. Great food, great value, nice people. Worth your time and money.

 

Gyradiko Restaurant Review – Carpentersville, IL

Gyradiko Restaurant Review – Carpentersville, IL

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